Games to Revisit: Kingdom Hearts II

Like any other RPG fan, I got very excited when Kingdom Hearts III was announced and later on upset for the delay. By the time this game would be released, I’ll be a mom of two and hopefully will have time to play. For now till the day of the release comes, I decided to go back to Kingdom Hearts II since I consider it my favorite.

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Kingdom Hearts II begins one year after the events of Kingdom Hearts and Chain of Memories. The game’s setting is a collection of various levels (referred to in-game as “worlds”) that the player progresses through. As in the first game, the player can travel to various Disney-based locales, along with original worlds specifically created for the series. While Disney-based worlds were primarily derived from the Disney animated features canon in the first game, Kingdom Hearts II introduces worlds that are based on Disney live-action films as well. Each world varies in appearance and setting, depending on the Disney film on which it is based. The graphics of the world and characters are meant to resemble the artwork style of the environments and characters from their respective Disney films. Each world is disconnected from the others and exists separately; with few exceptions, players travel from one world to another via a Gummi Ship.

Ever since I was young, I’ve been a Disney fan so the whole mash-up between Square Enix with them made this game one of my favorites. The environment setting as random as it may sound, was perfectly connected.

Now the characters of this game are definitely my favorite along side who we already know from Final Fantasy series and also the Disney characters, Sora, Kairi and Riku has their own unique personality which I mostly loved. The game as much as light-hearted and cheerful it intended to be, has a dark sad side and all that stems from the characters personalities and that made me appreciate the game more. To be more specific, the Organization XIII aspect of nobodies was amazing to me, as emo as they sound it made perfect sense to me while I was playing it obviously as an angst teenager. This is why I have so much connection with this game, short scenes like this …

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If you haven’t tried this game yet, I highly recommend starting this game from the first part to have more of a grasp about who’s Sora, the heartless and nobodies. I’m honestly too excited about the third part and I hope the hype of this game doesn’t kill it because it’s such an amazing game with a great story.

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Games to Revisit: ObsCure 2

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ObsCure II, known also as Obscure: The Aftermath, is a survival horror game and the sequel to ObsCure.

The story is set two years after the “Leafmore Incident” (the events of Obscure); Shannon and Kenny are now enrolled in the nearby Fallcreek University, while Stan is reforming his life as a Delivery Truck Driver. Stan and Kenny have to take medication to prevent the effects of the plant from infecting their bodies, while Shannon has been able to adapt to the changes.

As the story begins, a new drug created from a strange flower is quickly spreading its influence over the University’s populace. Soon enough, a small group of students, along with the Leafmore High survivors have to face a horde of mutants and try to stay alive.

I’ve played this game before trying the first part so I connected the older parts as I progressed in the game. I would describe this game as a Resident Evil game but also trying to be more like a teen slasher movie because of the having a stereotypical characters, like in the first part which taken place in a highschool. Now the characters are older, while adding new characters who still has the stereotypical element but this time for more of a university environment.

I personally enjoyed the story but I think it made some parts made the story trying too hard to give that gore-y aspect when it wasn’t that necessary, apart from that I would recommend this game along with the first part if you felt interested to know the past events.

Let me confess this, I got introduced to Sum 41 from the first part of this game where they featured Still Waiting.

The game as released back in PS2 but got released on Steam later on so you could buy both of them as a collection if you’re interested.

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Games to Revisit: Tomba! 2: The Evil Swine Return

Before I start this post, I’m very excited to say I’ve done my first guest posting on A Safe Space for Curious Minds Blog. If you’re interested in serial killers, murderers, haunted places stories be sure to follow the blog along with the two creators who made it Lise and Karalee.

Now onto the main topic of this post …

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The game centers on the exploits of a pink-haired feral child named Tomba as he attempts to rescue his girlfriend Tabby from a race of anthropomorphic and antagonistic pigs.

I’ve been obsessed with this game during my schooldays, I remember getting it from my cousins. The game is a platformer with a three-dimensional perspective in which movement is performed on predetermined linear paths. Whenever Tomba reaches a point where additional paths intersect with his current one, a set of flashing arrows appear above his head. At that point, Tomba can move in any direction that the arrows point. Some areas in the game enable the player to explore them in a top-down view, allowing Tomba to move around freely.

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I recently played it using ePSXe which is a PSOne emulator, using more refined and smooth settings. I feel this game deserves a remake as it goes hand in hand with Spyro and Crash Bandicoot. When I played it couple of days ago, I finished it in 7 hours which was shocking to me because I remember I spent days even weeks trying to finish most of the side quests along with the story-based quests.

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I confess that I played it at work since I wanted to waste time till I could go home and it was a time well spent, I really love this game. I highly recommend trying this game if you’re into platformer type of games and miss the nostalgia when those games were on the raise back then.

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Games to Revisit: Final Fantasy X

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Final Fantasy X is set in the fictional world of Spira, consisting of one large landmass divided into three subcontinents, surrounded by small tropical islands. It features diverse climates, ranging from the tropical Besaid and Kilika islands, to the temperate Mi’ihen region, to the frigid Macalania and Mt. Gagazet areas. Although predominantly populated by humans, Spira features a variety of races. Among them are the Al Bhed, a technologically advanced but disenfranchised sub-group of humans with distinctive green eyes and unique language. The Guado, which are less human in appearance, with elongated fingers and other arboreal features. Still less human are the lion-like Ronso and the frog-like Hypello. A subset of Spira’s sentient races are the “unsent”, the strong-willed spirits of the dead that remain in corporeal form. In Spira, the dead who are not sent to the Farplane by a summoner come to envy the living and transform into “fiends”, the monsters that are encountered throughout the game; however, unsent with strong attachments to the world of the living may retain their human form. Other fauna in Spira, aside from those drawn from real animals, such as cats, dogs, birds, and butterflies, include the gigantic, amphibious shoopufs (which are similar to elephants); and the emu-like chocobo, which appears in most Final Fantasy games. Spira is very different from the mainly European-style worlds found in previous Final Fantasy games, being much more closely modeled on Southeast Asia, most notably with respect to vegetation, topography, architecture, and names.

There are seven main playable characters in Final Fantasy X, starting with Tidus, a cheerful young teenager and a star blitzball player from Zanarkand, who seeks a way home after an encounter with Sin transported him to Spira. To do so, he joins Yuna , a summoner on a journey to obtain the Final Aeon and defeat the enormous whale-like “Sin”. Journeying with them are: Kimahri Ronso, a young warrior of the Ronso tribe who watched over Yuna during her childhood; Wakka, a blitzball player whose younger brother was killed by Sin; and Lulu, a stoic black mage close to Yuna and Wakka. During the journey, they are joined by Auron, a former warrior monk, who worked with both Tidus’ and Yuna’s fathers to defeat Sin 10 years prior; and Rikku, Yuna’s cousin, a perky Al Bhed girl and the first friendly person Tidus meets upon arriving in Spira.

I think this game is a J-RPG classic and every gamer I know have heard of Final Fantasy series whether through earlier releases or newer ones after Final Fantasy X. I remember the hype around this game back then, I was still in school and was completely addicted to PS2.

The story is very interesting and I think what attracted me the most in this game are the characters themselves. The characters are very like-able and to some point relate-able as well, and of course I’m all for a love story that Yuna and Tidus shared that made me tear up by the ending. Like every rpg you need to grind EXP for hours because the boss fights aren’t that easy which I enjoyed because it gave challenge to the game.

Can we talk about the music of this game, the tracks blew my mind. I cannot listen to “Zanarkand” track without getting emotional, sometimes I would actually tear up.

The HD remastered version got released on Steam and I instantly got it because I really miss this game, it gave me a surge of memories the moment I saw the main menu.

Have you ever played this game ? Let me know your thoughts in the comments.

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These Videogame Characters are Villains in Disguise

There’s a fine line between good and evil. In fact, many so-called good video game characters tend to have an evil side that remains hidden until you examine their actions. They can defend themselves by claiming, “It came from the heart,” or “Hyahhh!” so that we may overlook their flaws, but don’t let them fool you. Here is a list of seven characters who would make the perfect villain.

1. Princess Peach — Super Mario

If video games have taught us anything, it’s that facing the final boss means the end of the game is nigh. Bowser was the main villain of Super Mario Bros. and hasn’t been fought just the one time. To many Nintendo fans, he’s considered the main villain. But why would a plumber go through all that trouble just to save a princess who rewards him with a cake and a thank you, only to be captured again and you have to restart the whole thing? Is there more to her than meets the eye?

Princess Peach knows that Mario is wrapped around her little finger and that she can manipulate that mustachioed man to do her bidding. If she’s having a feud with Daisy, she might pretend she was kidnapped by her, and before you know it Daisy’s kingdom is in ruins! Let’s be real for a moment. Who’s to say Peach didn’t play the captured card a few times just to mess with Bowser? Could she be the ultimate Mario villain? That’s one game I want to play!

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2. King Mickey — Kingdom Hearts II

How is Walt Disney’s beloved mascot a villain? In Kingdom Hearts II he stays hidden most of the time while apparently telling other characters to help Sora through his quest. Then he shows up already wearing the Organization XIII cloak, knows all about the Big Bad, and yet remained hidden. He didn’t even help Sora until much later. Just what is Mickey hiding?

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3. Aerith — Final Fantasy VII

The iconic moment every RPG fan remembers is when Aeirth died, but it also left the biggest question hanging: Who did Aerith really love, Cloud or Zack? This is why she should be a villain — she broke the code of love when she fell for Zack, but then played Cloud. Maybe in the end Sephiroth was doing Cloud a favor and redirected him to the one he should be going for all along: Tifa.

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4. Sans — Undertale

How many times did you repeat the Sans battle? I bet the theme song was lodged in your head for days while you recalled his taunting words. Sans can be a villain because he’s got abilities most of the game’s characters lack — such as teleportation, which he refers to as “Shortcuts.” He also uses the most powerful attacks and breaks the fourth wall by being aware of the protagonist stats, save function, and number of times they died. Yep, he’s like a skeletal Deadpool.

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5. Link — The Legend Of Zelda

Have you ever really stopped to think about some of the bosses in The Legend of Zelda? Technically they are huge animals who are really the victims. I’m not kidding, they’re either forced to transform, locked in a small room or trapped within a magical mask. Basically, Link is killing animals who have absolutely no idea what’s going on and he’s still called a hero in every Zelda release.

Sure, Link may be the savior of Hyrule, but at what cost? Breaking and entering? Destroying valuable furniture? Animal cruelty? Theft? And let’s not forget poor, poor Mr. Potter and his shop of fantastically expensive pottery. He never even saw it coming.

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Go ahead, call him Zelda.

6. Conker — Conker’s Bad Fur Day

Conker’s Bad Fur Day was released in 2001 on Nintendo64 and was rated M, so you know that despite its cutesy cartoon style, it was deemed offensive and outrageous. Conker could be a perfect villain because he’s a jerk. No, seriously, he’s a huge ass and not ashamed to admit it. He’ll saw teddy bears in half, steal a poor caveman’s cave wife and, at some point in the game, he’ll even urinate on those around him. This is one squirrel that would make a devastating foe!

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7. The Hunting Dog — Duck Hunt

Do I need to explain this one? Give  me the opportunity to go one-on-one with this smug bastard. It’s not going to end nicely for him.

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I need to take a moment to calm myself after seeing this GIF

Do you agree or disagree with this list of covert villains? 

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